little digital video camera

Digital Video Basics for Teachers

In this lesson I found some interesting ideas from other teachers who are using digital video in their classrooms. I was inspired to see such diversity...even kindergarten teachers and P.E. classes have made movies!

How are teachers using digital video?

Take a look at two or more of the video examples described below. When you click on links to see the movie, a web site will open in a new window.

After viewing the movies that interest you most, think about whether a digital video project could be effective in any of your curricula and share your thoughts at the bottom of this page.


Grades K-2 * Language Arts, Social Studies

Link opens a new site in a new window The Story of "Speccy4Eyes"

Combining animation and digital video recording, this group of children between the ages of 5-7 created a social learning story about a boy who is teased for wearing glasses. They used a digital still camera for animating the clay figures and recorded their narration using a digital video camcorder.

This movie was created by a group of primary school students in Britain and was a winner of the 2004 Digital Video Awards of the British Educational Communications and Technology Agency (BECTA).

http://www.becta.org.uk/corporate/display.cfm?section=21&id=3207

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close

When you click on the movie link above, a new window should pop up for the BECTA 2004 video awards. If not, try these tips.


Turn off popup blocker options in your browser.

In WindowsXP, hold down the CONTROL key while you click on the movie link. Keeping holding it when you read and dismiss the popup message.

In the table, select one of these two connection speeds for opening the movie:

low bandwith = dialup connection
high bandwidth = cable modem or DSL

You will need one of the two types of movie players on your computer:

Windows users try Windows Media Player.
 Go to Download Page

Macintosh users users try QuickTime.
 Go to Download Page

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Grades 3-4 * Math

Link opens a new site in a new window A Day With Fractions

These elementary school students evidence their understanding of fractions by compiling examples of how they see fractions appear in their everyday lives at school. What's more, they used a typical classroom device cleverly to show the sequence of time!

When you watch this video, take notice of when they used still photos from a digital camera and when they used "live-action " video recordings.

Movie Credit: This example from the Apple Learning Interchange web site was contributed by Lainie McGann, Second Grade teacher. (The school name and town are not listed).

http://ali.apple.com/ali_sites/ali/exhibits/1000972/

close

close

When you click on the movie link above, a new window should pop up for the Apple Learning Interchange web site.

If no window opens, turn off popup blocker options in your browser.

In WindowsXP, hold down the CONTROL key while you click on the movie link. Keeping holding it when you read and dismiss the popup message.

The movies are embedded in the web page.

If you don't see the movie, you may need the Quick Time plug-in.

Both Windows and Macintosh Users:
Download QuickTimeOpens Quick Time web site in a help window

close

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Grades 3-6 * Physical Science, Math, Physical Education

Link opens a new site in a new windowPhysics in Everyday Life

These upper elementary school students explain the way forces work to handle a load on a bridge using an activity from their Physical Education class and drawings.

When you watch, think about the depth of understanding that these students demonstrate and the enthusiasm they express about their knowledge of physics. Who do you think did the editing for this project?

Credit: This example from the Apple Learning Interchange web site was contributed by a group of educators from the Echo Horizon School in Culver City, CA. A list of their names appears in the right column of the movie page.

http://ali.apple.com/ali_sites/ali/exhibits/1000972/

close

close

When you click on the movie link above, a new window should pop up for the Apple Learning Interchange web site.

If no window opens, turn off popup blocker options in your browser.

In WindowsXP, hold down the CONTROL key while you click on the movie link. Keeping holding it when you read and dismiss the popup message.

The movies are embedded in the web page.

If you don't see the movie, you may need the Quick Time plug-in.

Both Windows and Macintosh Users:
Download QuickTimeOpens Quick Time web site in a help window

close

top


Grades 5-6 * Dance, Creative Movement

Link opens a new site in a new window Jenny

This video features a girl named Jenny who performs a creative movement, interpretive dance routine with a classmate. This example is edited like a short documentary story about Jenny who has physical disabilities from Cerebral Palsy.

When you watch, notice how the story is being told. What is the first scene that establishes who Jenny is and how she moves from place to place? Do you ever see the puppeteer and Jenny at the same time? What do you think your students could gain from performing on screen, like Jenny?

This movie was created at the Mere Oaks School, a special needs education school in Britain and was a winner of the 2004 Digital Video Awards of the British Educational Communications and Technology Agency(BECTA).

http://www.becta.org.uk/corporate/display.cfm?section=21&id=3207

close

close

When you click on the movie link above, a new window should pop up for the BECTA 2004 video awards. If not, try these tips.


Turn off popup blocker options in your browser.

In WindowsXP, hold down the CONTROL key while you click on the movie link. Keeping holding it when you read and dismiss the popup message.

In the table, select one of these two connection speeds for opening the movie:

low bandwith = dialup connection
high bandwidth = cable modem or DSL

You will need one of the two types of movie players on your computer:

Windows users try Windows Media Player.
 Go to Download Page

Macintosh users users try QuickTime.
 Go to Download Page

close

top


Grades 7-8 * Natural Science, Second Language Learning

Link opens a new site in a new window Baffling Biomes

These middle school students scripted, performed, recorded and edited an educational feature presentation based on their study of biomes, including deserts, grasslands, and tundra. Their footage came from field trips to a zoo and aquarium.

When you watch, think about what the teacher's role might have been in helping the students create a clearly articulated presentation of their learning.

Credit: This example from the Apple Learning Interchange web site was contributed by a group of bilingual, ESL students led by their teacher Dorothy E. Henson.

http://ali.apple.com/ali_sites/ali/exhibits/1000871/

close

close

When you click on the movie link above, a new window should pop up for the Apple Learning Interchange web site.

If no window opens, turn off popup blocker options in your browser.

In WindowsXP, hold down the CONTROL key while you click on the movie link. Keeping holding it when you read and dismiss the popup message.

The movies are embedded in the web page.

If you don't see the movie, you may need the Quick Time plug-in.

Both Windows and Macintosh Users:
Download QuickTimeOpens Quick Time web site in a help window

close

top


Education Professionals * Child Psychology

Link opens a new site in a new windowUnderstanding Children's Thinking

This approach encourages the teacher to become a more mindful observer of individual children and to prepare materials, activities, or conversation topics that will advance their development.

Choose one of the two examples. As you read along, you will find the links to videos in the text.

When reading and viewing, think about what you might learn about a child from watching through a video camera lens. Would it be valuable for you to have short video clips of such ordinary moments in your classroom? What children or activities would you choose to study with a video camera?

Credit: This approach to using video in early childhood education is generated by a new professional development organization called Videatives. It is the work of Professor George Forman and his colleagues.

http://videatives.com/content/videatives/videatives.php

close

close

When you click on the movie link above, a new window should pop up for the Videatives web site.

If no window opens, turn off popup blocker options in your browser.

In WindowsXP, hold down the CONTROL key while you click on the movie link. Keeping holding it when you read and dismiss the popup message.

The movies are embedded as links within the text.

If the movie player does not open, you may need the Quick Time plug-in.

Both Windows and Macintosh Users:
Download QuickTimeOpens Quick Time web site in a help window

close

top


Think & Respond: Which movies did you view?

Speccy4eyes    (Grades K-2 * Lang. Arts, Social Studies)

A Day with Fractions    (Grades 3-4 * Math)

Physics in Everyday Life    (Grades 3-6 * Science, Math, P.E.)

Jenny    (Grades 5-6 * Dance, Creative Movement)

Baffling Biomes    (Grades 7-8 * Natural Science, ESL)

Understanding Children's Thinking    (Early Childhood)

First Name:

What do you teach? (Grades, Subjects):

What was your impression of what you saw? Did you get ideas about something that might work in your curricula or that might interest your students?

 

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